Driving 101: Patience Grasshopper

patienceThe common theme in almost every Driving 101 posts I have made is the impatience of drivers that roll along our highways.  You know the person – the one who pulls out in front of you forcing you to brake when there is absolutely no traffic behind you.  Then there is the person who flings their hands up in frustration because you didn’t run that red light.  Of course, who can ignore that driver who is tailgating you and would want to push you out of their way.

Impatience in driving is a huge problem.

Okay, I get it.  Driving is boring.  We hate it.  We are all trying to get from one place to another.  Unfortunately there are other people on the road doing the same thing.  Shocking I know.  It always amazes me in the morning commute when someone is driving at warp speed weaving in and out of traffic toward downtown.  I will usually say to that driver:  “We are all trying to get to work too.  You’re not the only one.”

The impatience thing is an epidemic.  Impatience often escalates into road rage.  So how can we deal with impatient drivers?

  1. Let it go.  Get out of their way when possible.  It’s not worth flipping someone off or getting shot by someone who gets mad about it.  Driving isn’t a competition.  You aren’t losing a race.  Ignore them.
  2. Stay calm.  Don’t get mad or try to make them more angry by slowing down even more or continuing to get in their way.  The important thing to do in these situations is to operate YOUR vehicle safely.  Even if the other driver wants to push you out into the road, you proceed when you feel it is safe because if you get hit because you feel stressed by the other driver, you will be the one hurt by it.  More than likely, the other driver will just swerve around you and leave you dealing with the accident.
  3. Don’t be one.  Don’t be the impatient driver.  Leave on time to get to your destination.  Watch the traffic report for any problems to decide if you need to take another route.  Don’t be so quick to hit the horn.  Don’t put others in danger.  Don’t deliberately prevent someone from merging or changing lanes.

As frustrating as it is, you can’t control what other people do, you can only control what you do.  Impatient drivers are a reality in our selfie generation.  Impatient drivers think the road is theirs and no one else matters.   Impatient drivers cause five million deadly accidents each year.  Some of the top impatient causes of these fatal accidents are speeding, failing to yield the right-of-way (I’m not sure anyone really knows who has the right-of-way these days), reckless driving and failure to obey traffic signs and signals.

One of the things I often see is when drivers are turning and they cut the turn too short into the other turn lane.  I can see the colors of other drivers’ eyes when they do this.  Last week I counted six people talking on their phones while making the turn.

I am often driving through the intersection of Old Hickory Boulevard and Highway 70S in Bellevue and I dread it.  There are way too many things going on there with drivers coming from every direction.  I have seen drivers take too many chances simply because they are impatient and refuse to wait for traffic to clear before entering the highway.

Be patience grasshopper.  Pay attention to the drivers around you.  Stay calm.

 

Advertisements

Driving 101: Turning Vehicles Ahead

driver

I have addressed the issue with impatient drivers in past blogs on Driving 101 and it is clearly evident when a vehicle is turning.  I see it in my own rearview mirror when I am turning and see the vehicle behind me barreling down on me.

It’s a common theme.   People do not want to stop.  They do not want you to impede them in any way so you’d better make that turn on two wheels.

We live in a “selfie” society where we have no patience in waiting on anything!  These days, almost everything can be accomplished with the push of a button, the click of an app, or the swipe of a card.  When one of these things slows us down we get frustrated.  Nowhere it shows more than behind the wheel.

If you are approaching a vehicle that is making a right turn, reduce your speed, safely change into another lane (if applicable) or safely pass the vehicle.   Do not assume what the vehicle is supposed to do.  Entrances to driveways or roads are not always obvious.

Also keep in mind that the vehicle ahead of you may also be yielding to pedestrians in a walk way.

The main thing is just to be patient.  It all comes down on us at some point when we have to make the turns too.  We want people to be patient with us so let’s make the practice for everyone.

If you are the one making a turn:

  • Begin decelerating and use your turn signal in advance of making the turn.
  • Yield to pedestrians who may be crossing your path.  Also be alert for any bicycle lanes.
  • Take the time necessary to make the turn.

In the complex where I live, there is no turn off lane so I have to slow down to make the turn.  I try to always give plenty of notice that I am turning so that the driver behind me can move to another lane.  Regardless of how much notice or how defensive I drive, there are many times when the driver will not slow down or change lanes.

People are going to turn.  Be patient.

 

 

 

Driving 101: Patience

angry-driver

If you asked me one thing that is a problem in traffic and I would immediately say it is impatient drivers.  Impatience causes a lot of frustrations on the roadway.

Yesterday was a good example as I was getting on the Interstate, another driver was tailgating me and flailing their arms at me because I wasn’t doing it fast enough.  The problem was that I had to wait for the drivers in front of me to do what they were going to do.  I couldn’t push them.  Once we got on the interstate, the driver behind me jerked their vehicle into the other lane and raced away.

I’m sure you have had your own experience with impatient drivers too.  Common examples are those who tailgate and trying to push you out of their way or drivers who fly by you on the left so they can cut in front of you to the exit or those who want to make two lanes before there are actually two lanes.

Most of these impatient moves actually don’t end up saving the impatient driver very much, if even a few seconds down the road.

Now I admit that I am not the perfect model for patience and I don’t like being delayed by slower drivers ahead of me either but some take their impatience to the extreme.  There is quite a driver arrogance when you honk legitimately at someone for being in the wrong and they either honk back at you or flip you off.     I had a guy do that one day when HE ran a stop sign and I honked at him.  He flipped me off and keep going.

Yes, we all have somewhere to be.  Unfortunately there are some who are not disciplined enough to leave in enough time to get to their location on time without having to use the roads as their personal NASCAR race to get to their destination.  When someone is impatient with me during the morning commute, I will make it a joke that THEY are the only ones who have to get to work.

Let’s all relax and take a deep breath.  Quit trying to one-up other drivers or force your way in traffic.  It’s a small world and we’re all trying to get somewhere.  Let’s get there safely.

Some places in Nashville that are in need of patience:

  • Drivers who are trying to get on I-65 North when other drivers are going straight on Rosa Parks.  I have seen people drive up on the sidewalk to get around.  It’s funny because they are in a hurry to get in line on I-65.
  • Drivers getting off the Broadway exit on I-40 who immediately try to make it two lanes before it actually has two lanes.
  • Drivers either entering downtown from I-40 exit ramp or those on the frontage road that insist on ignoring the red light.

Nearly ever time you drive, you will see another driver do something impatient or even reckless.  Take a deep breath and let it go.  None of us like injustice but be patient.   Being impatient will only make it worse.   Because there are so many people on the roads, we have the false sense of negativity of others and the idea that we will never see them again so we can act however we want.

Come on Nashville drivers!  Be patient!  They say we are one of the friendliest cities in America but there is little evidence of that on the highways.

 

 

 

Driving 101: Red Lights

red-lightMost of us were taught very early that red means “stop” but for a few select drivers in Nashville, red lights only mean that traffic could be coming from the other direction.  I had one fellow tailgating me through Belle Meade one day and he was furious that I had stopped at a red light instead of running it.  He jerked his truck around me and sped off when the light changed.

None of us like having to wait at a red light.  The average wait time at a red light is two minutes but it can longer in some areas depending on traffic flow and other factors.

Two minutes seem to be too long for the select drivers in Nashville.  I call them “speeeeecial” and drag out the middle part of that word when I say it.   Impatience is the main reason these special drivers run the red lights.  They do not think THEY have to wait.

A red light is a signal to STOP.  Not speed up.  Not roll through.

When approaching an intersection, you must stop before the pedestrian crosswalk or any markings before the intersection.

The most commonly violated red lights are the ones where traffic is exiting Interstate 40 into downtown.  I can usually count at least two vehicles that completely blow through this light. Nashville could make lots of fine money if they would patrol these areas.   Fines for running a red light range from $50 – $100.

So what constitutes running a red light in Tennessee?

The Tennessee Code Section 55-8-110 (e) states that it is not a violation unless the front tires of a vehicle cross the stop line after the signal is red.    A person commits the violation if their front tires are past the stop line when the light turns red.  A vehicle could be in the center of the intersection when the light turns red and not be subject to a citation.

In many instances I have witnessed, the nose of the car has not even broken the plane of the stop line when the light has already turned red.  Clearly a violation.

People run red lights for various reasons:

  • Impatience
  • Distracted or tired
  • Incorrectly estimating their speed and timing
  • Intoxicated or clouded judgment

Red light runners cause hundreds of deaths and injuries each year.  Most of downtown crashes involved drivers who ran red lights, stop signs and other traffic controls.

It also helps the personal injury law firms stay in business.

Two minutes could make a lot of difference.